Passport control in Nyborg


Passport (front page) issued 6th October 1830 by the chief of police in Odense to Mrs Sophie Magdalene Hein and Miss Frederikke Dallin for a journey to Copenhagen and back. The passport is now at Møntergården in Odense. Photo: Jens Gregers Aagaard.


Passport (back page) issued 6th October 1830 by the chief of police in Odense to Mrs Sophie Magdalene Hein and Miss Frederikke Dallin for a journey to Copenhagen and back. The passport is now at Møntergården in Odense. Photo: Jens Gregers Aagaard.

Intro

During the autocracy both foreign and Danish travellers had to show their passports when they travelled between Funen. The intention was to control citizens’ movements and hinder the spread of infectious diseases.

Power and revolt Power has appeared in many guises on this large island at the heart of Denmark. With coins and monuments and by prohibitions and punishments, successive rulers have reminded the people of Funen who was in charge. However, in opposition to this power, rebellion lurked! The instruments of power Power has always been on public display on Funen. Signboards and control limit people’s freedom of action and physical punishment was one way of enforcing the law – often in a bloody and brutal way.

This location is part of the exhibition 'Funen – at the centre of the universe', at Møntergården in Odense. Read more about the exhibition on our website.